General recommendations about in-water cleaning

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coral

Here are the General recommendations about in-water cleaning in Commonwealth waters:

  • Commonwealth waters extend from the 3 nautical mile line (the limit of coastal waters) seaward to the 12 nautical mile line (the limit of the territorial sea).
  • A slime layer on a vessel, regardless of origin, may be removed without full containment of biofouling waste, providing a gentle, non-abrasive technique is used.
  • Macrofouling (fouling that has progressed beyond a slime layer) acquired from beyond the Australian Economic Exclusion Zone, should not be cleaned in-water if Condition D in the Decision Support Tool cannot be met (i.e. technology is not available to minimise release of viable biological material into the water column).
  • Macrofouling acquired in another region within Australia should not be cleaned in-water unless a risk assessment determines that the biofouling is of low biosecurity risk. The coating should also be suitable for cleaning and the method used should not damage the coating surface or release amounts of contaminant into the environment that exceeds local standards or requirements.
  • Locally acquired macrofouling may be cleaned in-water providing the coating is suitable for cleaning and the cleaning method does not damage the coating surface or release unsuitable amounts of contaminant into the environment. The biofouling waste does not need to be contained.
  • Vessel owners/operators are encouraged to review the International Maritime Organization ‘2011 Guidelines for the Control and Management of Ships’ Biofouling to Minimize the Transfer of Invasive Aquatic Species’ (MEPC.207(62)) for further guidance on biofouling management practices.

Taken directly from : http://www.daff.gov.au/animal-plant-health/pests-diseases-weeds/marine-pests/anti-fouling-and-inwater-cleaning-guidelines/general-recommendations

 

After one Hull of a Scrub

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Boat hull cleaning made simple by hiring a professional scuba diver to do the dirty work. Here’s an example of the difference I made to this beauty. All the growth and plant life now gone.If you didn’t see what they looked like before the scrub, go to previous post for pictures of the “before”. The anodes don’t need changing just yet, however have scrubbed up well. The tools I used was a couple of 3M heavy duty sponges, a metal scrapper supplied by my client – his boat his responsibility, and a wooden block.

anodes after 

 

Here’s the prop showing the scars from it’s plant life hitch hikers.prop after

And the rudder all scrubbed up.

rudder after

Back to the helm